Landscape Design: part two

This post captures the story of the muddy, ever-evolving landscape plan. Early on in the ADU build, I engaged friends and landscape designers, Melissa + Chris of LandLine Design to help me orient and design the lots surrounding the host home + ADU. As it goes with all carefully detailed planning, things changed. Thus we were presented with the new challenge of re-designing the landscape design.

Now that the chickens were incorporated into the ADU yard, we had to consider separation of spaces. Chickens must be allowed to roam but separately from a planting area. We needed to find a new place to grow veggies. The dog needed to be able to run outside without getting sidetracked into herding the chickens. I had decided that there needed to be a more expansive view from the large kitchen windows. I wanted rooms with views of green space. Less fence and more yard. Anna and I sat down and hashed-out a rough plan. 3 separate zones, each with its own gate + purposed use.

 

Zone 1: Long path and landscaping that leads up to the ADU. This is where the chickens live. Plant life will be lush, mostly NW natives. Want to mimic the lushness of a Japanese pathway.

Zone 2: Enclosed courtyard  only accessible from the ADU. Roll-up door in the ADU will extend this space into another outside room in the summer. Inspired by tiny, lush European courtyards.

Zone 3: Garden and planting area. Accessed by side gate + back door of ADU. Area for River to go outside. Views from Kitchen widows.

I invited Chris + Melissa to walk over the new ideas and help troubleshoot and give professional input…

 

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It’s not gophers. Holes are dug for the fence posts.

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I specified an extra tall fence of 7′ to lend more privacy and seclusion from the host home.

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The 5′ offset on the North side of the ADU will now act as a side entry for the ADU backyard/planting area/dog run. A gate will keep the dog, River, from hassling the chickens. She will be able to let herself in/out through a dog door to access the yard at anytime.

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Remember the plank pathway to the ADU? A Japanese inspired pathway of 1/4″ minus will lead up to the home and allow for excellent drainage.

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Chris, Melissa, their darlings and myself compare the original landscape design to the new mock-up.

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Years ago, I had hired Chris’ husband Todd to design this chicken coop. Look at how perfectly the angles of the coop + ADU align!

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Ed dismantles the old chicken run. the larger chicken house will now belong to the host home as a garden shed. Wet tile saw in the foreground was being used for the kitchen backsplash.

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Bill Paris is an excellent multi-tasker and one of the most skilled contractors I know.

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Ed beginning to build the cedar fence that separates host home from ADU.

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Hours later, I inspect Ed’s work. It is perfect.

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Detail of cedar fence. Overlapping ends.

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Fencing will extend as siding onto the entryway of the ADU.

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Removable panels were designed in the fencing to accommodate moving furniture and tools into the ADU through the roll-up door.

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Fencing at the exterior entryway extends into the interior entry.

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